5 December, 2020

Messianic Apologetics

Addressing the Theological and Spiritual Issues of the Broad Messianic Movement

Messianic Lifestyle

J.K. McKee of Messianic Apologetics goes through the six study questions for Unit Five in The Messianic Walk workbook:

1. What do you, and/or your family, expect to get out of being a part of a Messianic congregation? Have you fully considered all, or at least most, of the dynamics of what it means to be involved in the restoration of Israel?

2. What might be some of the similarities, but also differences, between a Messianic Jewish congregation, and (a) a Jewish synagogue, (b) an evangelical Protestant church? Speculate if necessary.

3. Are you concerned at the presence of false teachings within the Messianic movement? How might this affect your involvement in a Messianic assembly? (If necessary, describe your experience.)

4. Do you have the perseverance and fortitude to truly see your involvement with the Messianic movement through, to whatever God has intended for it?

5. In your estimation, how important is it for the Body of Messiah to experience unity? Why do you think people have a tendency to divide over what are ultimately minor issues?

6. While Jewish and non-Jewish Believers do have their differences—do you think it is useful for Messianic congregations to focus on differences first, or common faith first? Which approach do you think will encourage unity, mutual honor and respect, and a pooling of gifts and talents?

Judah Himango and John McKee both agree that God’s Torah is essential instruction to be known, studied, and implemented by all of His people—yet there are challenges and problems which have to be navigated when one identifies the extremes of legalism and lawlessness.

J.K. McKee of Messianic Apologetics responds to three categories of questions: Tanach (OT), Apostolic Scriptures (NT), and theology/Biblical Studies.

1. Does Leviticus 11 only command ethnic Israelites to follow the kosher dietary laws?

2. Yeshua says that only God is good.

3. Are today’s Messianic people “Christians”?

Mark and Margaret Huey, and John McKee, each talk about what it means for today’s Messianic movement to see itself as recapturing the First Century faith experience in the Twenty-First Century. (1) Mixed assemblies of Jewish and non-Jewish Believers; (2) a polytheistic and immoral Roman Empire; (3) small home fellowships of Believers.